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Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

10 edition of What shall we do with the Negro? found in the catalog.

What shall we do with the Negro?

Lincoln, white racism, and Civil War America

by Paul D. Escott

  • 306 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by University of Virginia Press in Charlottesville .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lincoln, Abraham, -- 1809-1865 -- Political and social views,
  • Lincoln, Abraham, -- 1809-1865 -- Relations with African Americans,
  • Slaves -- Emancipation -- United States,
  • African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 19th century,
  • African Americans -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- History -- 19th century,
  • Race -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 19th century,
  • Racism -- United States -- History -- 19th century,
  • Whites -- United States -- Attitudes -- History -- 19th century,
  • United States -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1861-1865

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPaul D. Escott.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE457.2 .E73 2009
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Paginationxviii, 304p.
    Number of Pages332
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18736378M
    ISBN 109780813927862
    LC Control Number2008034652

    Throughout the Civil War, newspaper headlines and stories repeatedly asked some variation of the question posed by the New York Times in , "What shall we do with the negro?" The future status of African Americans was a pressing issue for those in both the North and in the : Paul D. Escott.   “Everybody has asked the question"What shall we do with the Negro?" I have had but one answer from the beginning. Do nothing with us! Your doing with us .

      What Shall We Do With the Negro? Published on Oct 2, Because race has resurfaced as an artificial issue over the past five years, I thought it would be timely to . Paul D. Escott is Reynolds Professor of History at Wake Forest University and the author of Slavery Remembered: A Record of Twentieth-Century Slave Narratives, winner of the Mayflower Cup, and "What Shall We Do with the Negro?": Lincoln, White Racism, and Civil War America (Virginia).

    Message from Frederick Douglass to Pita Sharples, Tariana Turia and anyone else who wants to 'do something' for 'their people': Everybody has asked the question ‘What shall we do with the Negro?’ I have had but one answer from the beginning. Do nothing with us! The 12 Things The Negro Must Do For Himself was a booklet sold in the early ’s. The retail price for this booklet was 10 cents. We learned about the book from Black Men In Founder and Publisher, Gary Johnson’s grandmother who gave him her original copy of the book which was in mint condition. The book sold for 10 cents.


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What shall we do with the Negro? by Paul D. Escott Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Paul D. Escott’s well-written, interesting, important, and revisionist ‘What Shall We Do with the Negro?’ urges general readers and historians not to romanticize and decontextualize historical events in general, and the Civil War, emancipation, and President Abraham Lincoln’s role as ‘the great emancipator’ in particular."--John David Smith, author of An Old Creed for the New Cited by:   Throughout the Civil War, newspaper headlines and stories repeatedly asked some variation of the question posed by the New York Times in"What shall we do with the negro?" The future status of African Americans was a pressing issue for those in both the North and in the South/5.

" 'What Shall We Do with the Negro?’ is the work of a veteran scholar who knows the primary and secondary sources of the Civil War era. This book will make a mark in the crowded field of Lincoln scholarship."--Joseph P.

Reidy, Howard University, author of From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia /5(9). Throughout the Civil War, newspaper headlines and stories repeatedly asked some variation of the question posed by the New York Times in“What shall we do with the negro?” The future status of African Americans was a pressing issue for those in both the North and in the South.

" 'What Shall We Do with the Negro?’ is the work of a veteran scholar who knows the primary and secondary sources of the Civil War era. This book will make a mark in the crowded field of Lincoln scholarship."--Joseph P. Reidy, Howard University, author of From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia, Author: Paul D.

Escott. " 'What Shall We Do with the Negro?’ is the work of a veteran scholar who knows the primary and secondary sources of the Civil War era.

This book will make a mark in the crowded field of Lincoln scholarship."—Joseph P. Reidy, Howard University, author of From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia Price: $ Book Description: Throughout the Civil War, newspaper headlines and stories repeatedly asked some variation of the question posed by the New York Times in"What shall we do with the negro?" The future status of African Americans was a pressing issue for those in both the North and in the South.

[Applause.] The American people have always been anxious to know what they shall do with us. Gen. Banks was distressed with solicitude as to what he should do with the Negro. Everybody has asked the question, and they learned to ask it early of the abolitionists, “What shall we do with the Negro?” I have had but one answer from the beginning.

Paul Escott, “What Shall We Do With the Negro?”Lincoln, White Racism, and Civil War America, University of Virginia Press,pp. Paul Escott, who teaches history at Wake Forest University has written a fascinating account of Civil-War-era racial.

" 'What Shall We Do with the Negro?' is the work of a veteran scholar who knows the primary and secondary sources of the Civil War era. This book will make a mark in the crowded field of Lincoln scholarship."--Joseph P.

Reidy, Howard University, author of From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia,Escott believes Lincoln has been miscast as Ratings: 1. Paul D Escott. "What Shall We Do with the Negro?"Lincoln, White Racism, and Civil War ttesville: University of Virginia Press, Pp.

In this provocative volume, Paul D. Escott takes dead aim at the "inspiring myths and idealistic themes of progress" that "dominate popular reflections" on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War era (xiv). Throughout the Civil War, newspaper headlines and stories repeatedly asked some variation of the question posed by the New York Times in"What shall we do with the negro?" The future status of African Americans was a pressing issue for those in both the North and in the South.

Consulting a broad range of contemporary newspapers, magazines, books, army records. In like manner, we answer those who are perpetually puzzling their brains with questions as to what shall be done with the Negro, "let him alone and mind your own business." If you see him plowing in the open field, leveling the forest, at work with a spade, a rake, a hoe, a.

After Words: Paul Escott, "What Shall We Do with the Negro?: Lincoln, White Racism, and Civil War America" interviewed by Jane Turner Censer, history professor, George Mason University. We are not afraid, we are not afraid We are not afraid today Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe We are not afraid today.

The truth shall make us free, the truth shall make us free The truth shall make us free some day Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe The truth shall make us free some day We shall live in peace, we shall live in peace We shall.

About the book, from the publisher:Throughout the Civil War, newspaper headlines and stories repeatedly asked some variation of the question posed by the New York Times in“What shall we do with the negro?” The future status of African Americans was a pressing issue for both those in the North and in the : Marshal Zeringue.

Prof. Escott’s book does not draw this conclusion, of course, but it points the reader in that direction. It would have been far better if the country had never had to ask itself, “What shall we do with the negro?” but the North’s answer was wiser and more far-sighted than that of the South.

" 'What Shall We Do with the Negro?' is the work of a veteran scholar who knows the primary and secondary sources of the Civil War era.

This book will make a mark in the crowded field of Lincoln scholarship."--Joseph P. Reidy, Howard University, author of From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia, /5(2).

"What Shall We Do with the Negro?" demonstrates how historians together with our larger national popular culture have wrenched the history of this period from its context in order to portray key figures as heroes or exemplars of national virtue.

Escott gives especial critical attention to. In Shall We Wake the President?, Tevi Troy, a presidential historian and former senior White House aide and deputy secretary of the Department of Health & Human Services, looks at the evolving role of the president in dealing with disasters, and looks at how our presidents have.

In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions. As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available.Buy What Shall We Do with the Negro: Lincoln, White Racism, and Civil War America by Paul D.

Escott (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on Reviews: 2.Buy a cheap copy of What Shall We Do with the Negro?: book by Paul D. Escott. Throughout the Civil War, newspaper headlines and stories repeatedly asked some variation of the question posed by the New York Times inWhat shall we do Free shipping over $